Pam Smith

Crops Technology Editor

Pamela Smith joined DTN/The Progressive Farmer staff as Crops Technology Editor in 2012. She previously was seeds and technology editor for Farm Journal Media. In addition to writing, reporting and photography, Pamela served as the writing coach for the magazine staff. A life-long Illinois native, she started her career as a field editor for Prairie Farmer magazine and has freelanced for a multitude of farm, food and travel magazines.

 

Pamela is a two-time winner of the American Agriculture Editor's Association Writer of the Year honors. In 2009, she received the Jesse H. Neal National Business Journalism award for a series on soybean rust. She was the first agricultural journalist to receive that coveted prize, often referred to as the Pulitzer of business journalism. In 2011, she received a second Neal award as part of a team covering the legacy of passing down the farm through the generations. She has also been named the journalist of the year by the American Phytopathological Society (plant pathologists) and was awarded a national food writing award for her profile of Father Dominic Garramone, a bread-baking priest. Five generations of her family farm in central Illinois -- spanning ages of 101 years to 6 months.

Recent Blogs by Author

More From This Author

  • Our weekly View From the Cab reports highlight the many activities on the farm during the season. Genny Haun reports in from Kenton, Ohio, and Kyle Krier details farm life from Claflin, Kansas. (Photos courtesy of Genny Haun and Kyle Krier)

    View From the Cab

    Farm, family and a little fun are on the agenda for DTN's View From the Cab farmers, Genny Haun from Kenton, Ohio, and Kyle Krier from Claflin, Kansas.

  • Our weekly View From the Cab reports highlight the many activities on the farm during the season. Genny Haun reports in from Kenton, Ohio, and Kyle Krier details farm life from Claflin, Kansas. (Photos courtesy of Genny Haun and Kyle Krier)

    View From the Cab

    Now that the crop is in the ground, the rain dances have begun for our DTN's View From the Cab farmers, Genny Haun from Kenton, Ohio, and Kyle Krier from Claflin, Kansas.

  • Our weekly View From the Cab reports highlight the many activities on the farm during the season. Genny Haun reports in from Kenton, Ohio, and Kyle Krier details farm life from Claflin, Kansas. (Photos courtesy of Genny Haun and Kyle Krier)

    View From the Cab

    The heat was on during Memorial Day to get planting operations finished before it rained on the parade for DTN's View From the Cab farmers, Genny Haun from Kenton, Ohio, and Kyle Krier from Claflin, Kansas.

  • Our weekly reports highlight the many activities on the farm. Genny Haun reports in from Kenton, Ohio, and Kyle Krier details farm life and work from Claflin, Kansas. (Photos courtesy of Genny Haun and Kyle Krier)

    View From the Cab

    The kids don't have to ask why you are tired at the end of the day when they work beside you. Not all chores involve fieldwork either. Our View From the Cab weekly correspondents Genny Haun from Kenton, Ohio, and Kyle Krier...

  • Corteva Agriscience will take seed to market in a variety of ways as they combine seed brands. (Logo courtesy of Corteva)

    New Seed Brand Focus

    The DowDuPont merger is resulting in a tighter focus of seed product portfolios and a broadening of retail and licensing opportunities.

  • Corteva Agriscience will take seed to market in a variety of ways as they combine seed brands. (Logo courtesy of Corteva)

    New Seed Brand Focus

    The DowDuPont merger is resulting in a tighter focus of seed product portfolios and a broadening of retail and licensing opportunities.

  • Genny Haun, Kenton, Ohio, and Kyle Krier, Claflin, Kansas, are deep in the details of spring planting this week. Our View From the Cab series will follow them throughout the 2018 crop season. (Photos courtesy of Genny Haun and Kyle Krier)

    View From the Cab

    It's hurry and wait in Kansas and Ohio as our View From the Cab farmers try to accomplish spring tasks. And it's making for some sleepless nights.

  • Bees have many challenges beyond pesticides, but consumers don't know that if we don't share the story. (DTN photo by Pamela Smith)

    Crop Production Blog

    Can you find a few buzzy phrases to get your point across? It makes spreading your agricultural message a tad sweeter.

  • Genny Haun and Kyle Krier represent the new crop of agriculturalists. They stepped up to welcome readers into their homes and onto their farms this season. (Photos courtesy of Genny Haun and Kyle Krier)

    View From the Cab

    We'll be checking in with Kansas farmer Kyle Krier and Ohio farmer Genny Haun throughout the 2018 growing season.

  • These puckered-up soybeans are characteristic of dicamba injury. Volatility is one of the several ways new formulations can move off-target. (DTN photo by Pamela Smith)

    Dicamba Details - 6

    Here's what you can do to attempt to limit the volatility associated with new dicamba formulations this spring.

  • Growers and custom applicators who use dicamba will need to take extra effort to properly clean the sprayer and spray tank. (DTN photo by Gregg Hillyer)

    Dicamba Details - 3

    Spray hygiene critical with dicamba herbicides.

  • Soybeans are super sensitive to off-target movement of dicamba. In this field split between dicamba tolerant and non-tolerant soybeans, a spray application moved beyond the dedicated buffer to pucker varieties sensitive to the herbicide. (DTN photo by Pamela Smith)

    DTN Blog of the Week

    It's time to do your diligence on dicamba. Spray applicators using the new low volatility formulations will be under a microscope this season.

  • Spray applicators face a long list of restrictions if they plan to spray dicamba herbicide this spring. (DTN photo by Pamela Smith)

    Dicamba Details - 1

    Understanding the labels connected with dicamba is critical as spray rigs head to the field this spring.

  • While getting every plant to emerge together is an admirable goal, two to four days is probably more realistic. Keeping a close eye on emergence gives a peek at what yield is possible and the confidence to invest in additional inputs. (DTN/The Progressive Farmer photo by Pamela Smith)

    Eye on Emergence

    Yields can spike when corn plants come up together.

  • Storm clouds in the sky give us a visual detection of rain, but turns out it also has a smell. (DTN photo by Pamela Smith)

    My Head in the Ozone

    Can you smell the rain? Well ... yes, it turns out you can.