Russ Quinn

DTN Staff Reporter
Russ Quinn is a DTN editor and reporter. He was born and raised in east central Nebraska on a cow-calf and row-crop farm near Elkhorn, which he still operates with his dad.

Russ attended Iowa Western Community College in Council Bluffs, Iowa, and graduated with an associate's degree in agribusiness and farm management in 1994. He then attended the University of Nebraska in Lincoln, Nebraska, and graduated with a bachelor's degree in agricultural sciences in 1996.

After graduating, he began working for DTN in May of 1997 in the agriculture telesales department. In May of 1998 he was promoted to his current position in the DTN ag newsroom. Over the years, Russ has had many different editing and reporting duties and currently writes original articles including the growing-season series "View From the Cab" and the weekly column "Russ' Vintage Iron."

Recent Blogs by Author

More From This Author

  • A five-year study looks at the results of a confinement system compared to a production system using multiple types of forages. The study will look at break-even comparisons and pregnancy rates, Image by Debra L. Ferguson

    Manage Expansion Goals

    Declining cattle numbers in some regions of the country are a door of opportunity for Nebraska's producers. That's what Jim MacDonald believes, and it was the focus of a field day earlier this year at the Eastern Nebraska...

  • Rye grows in one of Kerry and Angela Knuth’s fields, near Mead, Nebraska, Image by Russ Quinn

    Cover-Crop Value

    Kerry and Angela Knuth were hesitant to delay planting and shift to shorter-season corn hybrids all for the sake of letting cattle graze a spring cover of rye. They're starting to see the benefits and possibilities, though...

  • Forage crops in most of the Midwest are not having a normal growing season thanks to a cool, wet first half of the growing season. (DTN photo by Katie Dehlinger)

    Hay Prices Rising

    Wet, cool weather in the first half of the growing season for most of the Midwest has had a negative effect on forage crops.

  • MAP prices rose in the last week, with the average up $5/ton from DTN's previous report. (DTN chart)

    DTN Retail Fertilizer Trends

    Fertilizer prices continue to put in mixed showings with some higher, some lower -- but none by a sizeable amount.

  • Russ' Vintage Iron

    Some vintage tractors are bringing in quite a bit of money as collector's items.

  • Urea prices increased $7 per ton from last month to an average $435/ton. The nitrogen fertilizer is 19% more expensive than last year. (DTN Chart)

    DTN Retail Fertilizer Trends

    Retail fertilizer prices saw only minor changes from last month. The average urea prices increased by $7/ton, the largest change of the eight fertilizers tracked by DTN.

  • Anhydrous prices dropped $4 per ton compared to last month with retail prices averaging $591/ton. Prices remain 17% higher than last year. (DTN Chart)

    DTN Retail Fertilizer Trends

    Retail fertilizer values made muted moves this week, continuing a trend of relatively flat prices for non-nitrogen fertilizers.

  • Cow-calf producers always have a difficult decision on what to do with cows that have lost calves. Some will keep the cows for rebreeding while others decide to cull their cows. (DTN/Progressive Farmer photo by Becky Mills)

    Managing Cows with Lost Calves

    High calf losses from the extreme winter weather and flooding earlier this year could make it a time for tough decisions for cattle producers on what to do with the remaining cows.

  • Retail anhydrous prices dropped $5 compared to last month, coming in at $590/ton. Prices may be 17% higher than last year, but they are tracking close to the five-year average. (DTN Chart)

    DTN Retail Fertilizer Trends

    Half the retail fertilizer prices tracked by DTN moved lower this week, while the other half were higher.

  • AGCO's new DM1300 series butterfly mower system allows three mowers mounted front and back of a tractor to work in tandem for a 30-foot width cut. The system is branded Hesston by Massey Ferguson. (File photo by AGCO)

    Preseason Hay Safety Check

    This time of year there is always anticipation as farmers return to their fields. This is especially true as they prepare for another forage-harvest season, whether it is alfalfa or different types of grass hay.

  • The 4R strategy manages the right resources at the right rate, right time and right place, Image by Jim Patrico

    Four Rs Of Nutrients

    The three Rs have long been seen as the foundation of a well-rounded education. Now, some farmers are touting four Rs as a way to achieve a well-rounded nutrient strategy.

  • Alfalfa winterkill seems to be an issue this spring throughout Wisconsin and stretching into surrounding states such as northern Illinois and eastern Minnesota. (DTN file photo)

    Spring Forage Update

    The cool, wet spring has afforded ample moisture to most areas of the Midwest, which should be good news when the weather finally warms up, but which has also slowed growth of many forages, potentially affecting yields.

  • A lightning strike is thought to be the reason for a fire at the Cooperative Producers, Inc. (CPI) dry fertilizer facility in Hastings, Neb., last week. It had just opened last year and had a storage capacity of 42,000 tons. (DTN Photo by Linda Nellson)

    DTN Retail Fertilizer Trends

    The average retail price of urea jumped $20/ton from last month, a 5% increase, while the rest of the fertilizers saw small price changes.

  • Urea prices increased $14 from last month to $418/ton. The nitrogen fertilizer is 14% more expensive than it was at the same time last year. (DTN Chart)

    DTN Retail Fertilizer Trends

    Half of the retail fertilizer prices tracked by DTN moved lower this week, while the other half turned higher.

  • Handling and transporting anhydrous ammonia in a professional manner is important to assuring nitrogen is properly applied in a safe manner, according to Mark Hanna, retired Iowa State University Extension ag engineer. (DTN file photo)

    Avoid NH3 Mishaps

    Following all safety procedures and utilizing personal protective equipment when handling anhydrous ammonia can prevent mishaps.

  • Russ' Vintage Iron

    Stories of heat housers evoke fond memories for those who lived and worked with them.

  • DAP had an average price of $497 per ton the fourth week of April 2019, the first time since the fourth week of October 2018 that DAP has fallen below the $500-per-ton level. (DTN chart)

    DTN Retail Fertilizer Trends

    For the first time in several weeks, average retail prices for the majority of fertilizers were slightly lower compared to last month.

  • Stress in agriculture can be caused by several different sources, such as when historic flooding left some farmers unable to get to their cattle to feed them. In this case, a Nebraska farmer sat patiently waiting for a National Nebraska Guard helicopter to deliver donated hay to his cattle. (Nebraska National Guard photo by Spc. Lisa Crawford)

    Dealing with Stress

    Continuous stress can affect people physically and mentally, but there are things you can do to cope with stress.

  • The retail price of anhydrous is 17% higher compared to last year, but its price is a bit lower than last month. (DTN graphic)

    DTN Retail Fertilizer Trends

    Half of the eight major fertilizers' prices were higher, compared to last month. Farmers are reporting there have been some issues with supply as many people are attempting to apply anhydrous.

  • The retail price of anhydrous is 17% higher compared to last year, but its price is a bit lower than last month. (DTN graphic)

    DTN Retail Fertilizer Trends

    Half of the eight major fertilizers' prices were higher, compared to last month. Farmers are reporting there have been some issues with supply as many people are attempting to apply anhydrous.