Elaine Kub

Contributing Analyst
Elaine Kub

Elaine Kub is the author of Mastering the Grain Markets: How Profits Are Really Made -- a 360-degree look at all aspects of grain trading, which draws on her experiences as a futures broker, market analyst, grain merchandiser, and farmer. She grew up on a family farm in South Dakota and holds an engineering degree and an MBA.

More From This Author

  • Although the 2020 upsurge of desert locusts won't destroy 100% of the crops in all the countries projected to be affected, these widespread countries produce a significant share of global grain. (Graphic by Elaine Kub)

    Kub's Den

    The most devastating crop pest in the world, the desert locust, is currently swarming in East Africa and Asia, threatening food supplies and the global grain balance sheet.

  • In state-by-state numbers, North Dakota stands out as being severely behind its average planting progress for this time of year. (Chart by Elaine Kub)

    Kub's Den

    Although nationwide data makes it look as if row crop planting has been a breeze in the spring of 2020, there are localized spots where challenges have been insurmountable and are likely to result in outright acreage loss.

  • If $220 annual cash rent could be received for an acre of Iowa farmland forever, the present value could be calculated like a perpetuity, but that value is tremendously sensitive to your assumptions about the long-term discount rate. (Chart by Elaine Kub)

    Kub's Den

    Lower interest rates typically imply higher justified asset prices, and now that interest rates are at record-low levels, their influence may be outweighing some of the COVID-19 bearishness.

  • When fear hits markets, overreactions can create negative bubbles. (Chart by Elaine Kub)

    Kub's Den

    When fear hits markets, overreactions can create "negative bubbles." Market behavior from the long-ago history of previous plagues can be a guide for patterns now repeating in 2020.

  • Prior to the contract's expiration on April 21, the May crude oil futures contract traded at an intraday low of -$40.32 per barrel on April 20 and the spreads between nearby contracts went into contango. (Chart by Elaine Kub)

    Kub's Den

    When futures traders are threatened with having to find storage capacity for physical commodities, we are now living in a world where negative commodity prices are no longer a theoretical impossibility.