Elaine Kub

Contributing Analyst
Elaine Kub

Elaine Kub is the author of Mastering the Grain Markets: How Profits Are Really Made -- a 360-degree look at all aspects of grain trading, which draws on her experiences as a futures broker, market analyst, grain merchandiser, and farmer. She grew up on a family farm in South Dakota and holds an engineering degree and an MBA.

More From This Author

  • All the great civilizations, including the Egyptians, were only possible once they started growing grain. (Photo courtesy of Keith Yahl; CC BY 2.0)

    Kub's Den

    During the time when any nation state thrived, it was only possible because of grain, such as wheat, which was an easily taxable product.

  • The Panama Canal is identified as one of 14 major global chokepoints for food and fertilizer shipments. (Photo by Elaine Kub)

    Kub's Den

    If a commodity isn't physically available where it's needed, it hardly matters how much of it exists anywhere else. The skyrocketing spring wheat market exhibits this phenomenon, and global political analysts now recognize the...

  • (DTN photo by Greg Horstmeier)

    DTN Before The Bell Grain Comments

    Corn 3 1/2 lower. Soybeans 3 1/4 lower. Chicago wheat 6 1/4 lower. Despite a small pullback Thursday morning, Minneapolis spring wheat continues to trend higher.

  • In the week from June 6 to June 13, 2017, speculators dumped more than 100,000 short futures and options positions in the corn market, yet they still have a net bearish outlook for prices. (DTN illustration by Elaine Kub)

    Kub's Den

    In dry, hot weather, speculators have completely abandoned any bearish positions in hard red spring wheat futures or options, but corn traders still have a lot of short-covering to do before they completely disavow their bearish...

  • A 9-bushel-per-acre drop in the nationwide corn yield projection certainly sounds like something that could spark a rally in corn prices -- similar to the one crude oil experienced after OPEC announced its cuts. (Chart by Elaine Kub)

    Kub's Den

    If all American farmers formed a cartel and agreed to cut back production of corn, or soybeans, or wheat, would prices jump high enough to offset the lost revenue from fewer bushels being sold?

  • (DTN photo by Greg Horstmeier)

    DTN Before The Bell Grain Comments

    Corn 1 higher. Soybeans 3 1/4 lower. Chicago wheat 1/2 higher. Futures for the hard wheat varieties and most other commodities are also higher.

  • (DTN photo by Greg Horstmeier)

    DTN Before The Bell Grain Comments

    Corn 1 higher. Soybeans 3 3/4 higher. Chicago wheat 1 3/4 higher. Futures for the hard wheat varieties and most other commodities are also higher.

  • (DTN photo by Greg Horstmeier)

    DTN Before The Bell Grain Comments

    Corn 1 3/4 higher. Soybeans 3 1/4 higher. Chicago wheat 2 higher. Futures for the hard wheat varieties and most other commodities are also higher.

  • Periods of high futures trading volume don't necessarily provide the best price opportunities, but the two measures do frequently coincide, and can serve as a signal to make sales. (Illustration by Elaine Kub)

    Kub's Den

    In a low-volatility grain market environment, prices on any one day can seem just as unappealing as the next, making it hard to get motivated to make timely sales. Perhaps there is a best time of day or best day of the week to...

  • (DTN photo by Greg Horstmeier)

    DTN Before The Bell Grain Comments

    Corn 1 1/4 lower. Soybeans 3 lower. Chicago wheat 1/2 lower. Futures for the hard wheat varieties and most other commodities are also lower.

  • (DTN photo by Greg Horstmeier)

    DTN Before The Bell Grain Comments

    Corn 2 higher. Soybeans 1 3/4 higher. Chicago wheat 3 higher. Futures for the hard wheat varieties and most other commodities are also higher.

  • Traders of the July-to-December KC wheat spread (typically commercial elevator merchandisers) had already factored in their peak bullishness by 6 a.m. Monday morning after the snowstorm... before the speculators' reaction really got started! (Chart by Elaine Kub)

    Kub's Den

    A close evaluation of how information passed through the panicky wheat market last week provides a lesson about how grain markets signal their intentions when reacting to weather concerns -- a lesson that corn and soybean...

  • In Latin, the two-directional palindrome "Sator arepo tenet opera rotas" meant, roughly, "The farmer reaps with the plow." (Graphic by Elaine Kub)

    Kub's Den

    According to an ancient Latin proverb, "The farmer reaps with the plow." As important as planting date may be to an individual field's yield prospects, the U.S. corn and soybean futures markets seem largely unconcerned with...