Elaine Kub

Contributing Analyst
Elaine Kub

Elaine Kub is the author of Mastering the Grain Markets: How Profits Are Really Made -- a 360-degree look at all aspects of grain trading, which draws on her experiences as a futures broker, market analyst, grain merchandiser, and farmer. She grew up on a family farm in South Dakota and holds an engineering degree and an MBA.

More From This Author

  • (DTN photo by Greg Horstmeier)

    DTN Before The Bell Grain Comments

    Corn 1 higher. Soybeans 3 1/4 lower. Chicago wheat 1/2 higher. Futures for the hard wheat varieties and most other commodities are also higher.

  • (DTN photo by Greg Horstmeier)

    DTN Before The Bell Grain Comments

    Corn 1 higher. Soybeans 3 3/4 higher. Chicago wheat 1 3/4 higher. Futures for the hard wheat varieties and most other commodities are also higher.

  • (DTN photo by Greg Horstmeier)

    DTN Before The Bell Grain Comments

    Corn 1 3/4 higher. Soybeans 3 1/4 higher. Chicago wheat 2 higher. Futures for the hard wheat varieties and most other commodities are also higher.

  • Periods of high futures trading volume don't necessarily provide the best price opportunities, but the two measures do frequently coincide, and can serve as a signal to make sales. (Illustration by Elaine Kub)

    Kub's Den

    In a low-volatility grain market environment, prices on any one day can seem just as unappealing as the next, making it hard to get motivated to make timely sales. Perhaps there is a best time of day or best day of the week to...

  • (DTN photo by Greg Horstmeier)

    DTN Before The Bell Grain Comments

    Corn 1 1/4 lower. Soybeans 3 lower. Chicago wheat 1/2 lower. Futures for the hard wheat varieties and most other commodities are also lower.

  • (DTN photo by Greg Horstmeier)

    DTN Before The Bell Grain Comments

    Corn 2 higher. Soybeans 1 3/4 higher. Chicago wheat 3 higher. Futures for the hard wheat varieties and most other commodities are also higher.

  • Traders of the July-to-December KC wheat spread (typically commercial elevator merchandisers) had already factored in their peak bullishness by 6 a.m. Monday morning after the snowstorm... before the speculators' reaction really got started! (Chart by Elaine Kub)

    Kub's Den

    A close evaluation of how information passed through the panicky wheat market last week provides a lesson about how grain markets signal their intentions when reacting to weather concerns -- a lesson that corn and soybean...

  • In Latin, the two-directional palindrome "Sator arepo tenet opera rotas" meant, roughly, "The farmer reaps with the plow." (Graphic by Elaine Kub)

    Kub's Den

    According to an ancient Latin proverb, "The farmer reaps with the plow." As important as planting date may be to an individual field's yield prospects, the U.S. corn and soybean futures markets seem largely unconcerned with...

  • (DTN photo by Greg Horstmeier)

    DTN Before The Bell Grain Comments

    Corn 2 lower. Soybeans 4 1/2 lower. Chicago Wheat 2 1/4 lower. Futures for the hard wheat varieties are stronger.

  • (DTN photo by Greg Horstmeier)

    DTN Before The Bell Grain Comments

    Corn 1/2 lower. Soybeans 3 3/4 higher. Wheat 2 1/2 lower. Futures for the hard wheat varieties are also lower.

  • (DTN photo by Greg Horstmeier)

    DTN Before The Bell Grain Comments

    Corn 1 3/4 higher. Soybeans 4 higher. Wheat 2 higher. Spring wheat futures are lightly lower Thursday morning after some recent volatile gains.

  • (DTN photo by Greg Horstmeier)

    DTN Before The Bell Grain Comments

    Corn 2 1/2 higher. Soybeans 9 higher. Wheat 3/4 higher. Spring wheat is within a few pennies of completely recovering last week's losses.

  • The 24-hour rainfall at the start of this week in Buenos Aires and Sante Fe showed totals as high as 100 mm (upwards of 3 inches), and for the entire weekend there were some 7-to-8-inch totals. (DTN graphic)

    Kub's Den

    Soybean prices have appeared more responsive to broad projections of supply than to the ongoing flooding concerns in Argentina, the third-largest soybean-producing country. This may be due to trading programs becoming less and...

  • Overgrown by grass and brush, an old seed drill sits unused in South Dakota. (DTN photo by Elaine Kub)

    Kub's Den

    When the horse-drawn seed drill was invented in 1701, Jethro Tull would not have guessed how popular, then unpopular, its usage would become on the American Plains in the ensuing 316 years, with wheat acreage expected to drop...

  • (DTN photo by Greg Horstmeier)

    DTN Before The Bell Grain Comments

    Corn 1/2 lower. Soybeans 5 3/4 lower. Wheat 2 3/4 higher. Nearby soybean and corn contracts are at their lowest levels in 2017.

  • (DTN photo by Greg Horstmeier)

    DTN Before The Bell Grain Comments

    Corn 1/4 lower. Soybeans 3 3/4 lower. Wheat 1/4 higher. Investors remain jittery about stocks and about commodity demand.

  • (DTN photo by Greg Horstmeier)

    DTN Before The Bell Grain Comments

    Corn 3/4 lower. Soybeans 2 1/2 lower. Wheat 3 1/4 lower. While the stock market is in sudden meltdown, the grain markets' lack of momentum looks pretty good, compared to the alternative.

  • (DTN photo by Greg Horstmeier)

    DTN Before The Bell Grain Comments

    Corn 2 lower. Soybeans 1 1/2 lower. Wheat 2 3/4 lower. Nearby soybean futures continue to hover on either side of $10.00.

  • (DTN photo by Greg Horstmeier)

    DTN Before The Bell Grain Comments

    Corn 2 higher. Soybeans 4 higher. Wheat 2 3/4 higher. Trading volume has so far been extremely light, leaving the day's direction still to be established.

  • Risk management should be at the top of farmers' minds during the month of March, when crop insurance decisions are made and government reports typically spark market volatility. (DTN photo illustration by Elaine Kub)

    Kub's Den

    The median American farmer's "paycheck" tends to go either up or down by $20,000 per year, according to USDA data, emphasizing the importance of risk protection.

  • (DTN photo by Greg Horstmeier)

    DTN Before The Bell Grain Comments

    Corn 1 1/4 higher. Soybeans 2 1/4 higher. Wheat 1 lower. Likely profit-taking from the wild stock market may not benefit the grains.

  • (DTN photo by Greg Horstmeier)

    DTN Before The Bell Grain Comments

    Corn 2 1/4 lower. Soybeans 6 1/2 lower. Wheat 3 lower. So far, these markets are giving back only a few cents of the week's double-digit gains.

  • (DTN photo by Greg Horstmeier)

    DTN Before The Bell Grain Comments

    Soybeans are 7 cents higher. Wheat are 6 1/2 cents higher. Grains may not be able to ignore a stronger dollar as the session continues.

  • (DTN chart by Elaine Kub)

    Kub's Den

    Commodity producers can borrow analysis tools from the stock investing industry to compare each crop's "alpha" above and beyond the overall commodity markets' performance.