Elaine Kub

Contributing Analyst
Elaine Kub

Elaine Kub is the author of Mastering the Grain Markets: How Profits Are Really Made -- a 360-degree look at all aspects of grain trading, which draws on her experiences as a futures broker, market analyst, grain merchandiser, and farmer. She grew up on a family farm in South Dakota and holds an engineering degree and an MBA.

More From This Author

  • Much of the drought in the United States is in regions without much grain production, but there are some notable overlaps. (Graphic compilation by Elaine Kub)

    Kub's Den

    Much of the drought in the United States during the 2022 growing season occurred in regions without much grain production. But there have been some notable overlaps, particularly during critical timeframes for crop reproduction.

  • Late-planted soybeans (June 8) in South Dakota still filling pods on Sept. 5, 2022. (Photo by Elaine Kub)

    Kub's Den

    There is an impression that soybean yields tend to be less volatile than corn yields during challenging growing seasons, but the past 50 years of yield data doesn't necessarily bear out that assumption for individual locations.

  • Normalizing urea prices from 2009 through 2022 shows a predictable pattern of relatively high prices during planting season and a less-predictable annual low in early September. (Chart by Elaine Kub)

    Kub's Den

    Gun shy after last fall's sudden rally in fertilizer prices, grain producers looking ahead to fall and spring applications for the 2023 crop may be willing to buy supplies earlier than usual.

  • From March to June 2022, soybean meal in the U.S. was priced less than 1.5 times the value of DDGS, but recent developments have pulled the two feed ingredients back into a more typical relationship. (Graphic by Elaine Kub)

    Kub's Den

    The global panic about feed grains availability may have left oilseeds and their crush products underpriced for several months, but the price ratios are now working back toward normal.

  • Fuel surcharges included in rail freight pricing may eventually come down in coming weeks if diesel prices remain off their recent highs. (Graphic by Elaine Kub)

    Kub's Den

    When freight rates rise by 10 or 20 cents per bushel, shippers must either pay farmers 10 cents less or charge end users 10 cents more or both.