Russ Quinn

DTN Staff Reporter
Russ Quinn
Russ Quinn is a DTN editor and reporter. He was born and raised in east central Nebraska on a cow-calf and row-crop farm near Elkhorn, which he still operates with his dad.

Russ attended Iowa Western Community College in Council Bluffs, Iowa, and graduated with an associate's degree in agribusiness and farm management in 1994. He then attended the University of Nebraska in Lincoln, Nebraska, and graduated with a bachelor's degree in agricultural sciences in 1996.

After graduating, he began working for DTN in May of 1997 in the agriculture telesales department. In May of 1998 he was promoted to his current position in the DTN ag newsroom. Over the years, Russ has had many different editing and reporting duties and currently writes original articles including the growing-season series "View From the Cab" and the weekly column "Russ' Vintage Iron."

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  • People look over optical sensing technology on a high-clearance sprayer at a University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL) Project Sensors for Efficient Nitrogen Use and Stewardship of the Environment (SENSE) field day near Schuyler, Nebraska, on Aug. 7. (DTN photo by Russ Quinn)

    Making SENSE of Crop Sensors

    The SENSE project is a partnership of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension, the Nebraska Corn Board and Nebraska Natural Resource Districts, which focuses on crop canopy sensors directing variable-rate, in-season...

  • North Dakota producers have turned to corn, oats, wheat, barley and canola for forage, either haying or grazing these crops. (DTN photo by Chris Clayton)

    Hay Donations Available

    Recent rains in the Dakotas came too late to help most forages affected by drought. Here are some options for what to feed, or how to obtain feed, for your livestock.

  • 10-34-0 had an average price of $426 per ton the first week of August 2017. The fertilizer is now 22% less expensive than it was a year ago. (DTN chart)

    DTN Retail Fertilizer Trends

    Average retail prices for all eight major fertilizers were lower again the first week of August 2017, continuing a trend that has lasted for the past several weeks.

  • Anhydrous showed another large decrease in price the fourth week of July 2017, down 13% from last month. The nitrogen fertilizer had an average price of $423 per ton the fourth week of July. (DTN chart)

    DTN Retail Fertilizer Trends

    Some retail fertilizers -- mainly nitrogen fertilizers -- continued to see significant price decreases the fourth week of July 2017. Despite the lower prices, some farmers say they will wait until later in the year to start buying...

  • Employees at AGCO's Jackson, Minnesota, assembly plant use Google Glass to make operations run more efficiently. (DTN photo by Russ Quinn)

    AGCO Uses Glass Technology

    AGCO is using a new technology, Google Glass, in the manufacturing of farm equipment. It allows the company to become more efficient when assembling tractors and application equipment.

  • Extreme weather and changing nitrogen uptake by modern corn hybrids are forcing farmers to closely monitor their crops to ensure the crop has enough nitrogen when the crop needs the nutrients. (DTN photo by Pam Smith)

    Monitoring Nitrogen Better

    Tools such as nitrogen modeling are becoming more popular as farmers want some help to assure nitrogen is available for rapidly growing corn plants.

  • With an average retail price of $229 per ton the third week of July 2017, UAN28 is 6% less expensive compared to the previous month. (DTN chart)

    DTN Retail Fertilizer Trends

    For the third week in a row, average retail fertilizer prices continued to decrease. Anhydrous, urea and UAN28 saw the biggest price drops.

  • Russ' Vintage Iron

    DTN Staff Reporter Russ Quinn shares a story about learing something new.

  • Urea is currently 5% less expensive compared to a month earlier. Urea had an average price of $321 per ton the second week of July 2017. (DTN Chart)

    DTN Retail Fertilizer Trends

    Average retail prices for all eight of the major fertilizers were lower the second week of July 2017 compared to a month earlier, with anhydrous and urea seeing the biggest price declines.

  • Anhydrous was down 8% compared to last month. The nitrogen fertilizer average price was $462/ton. (DTN graphic by Scott R Kemper)

    DTN Retail Fertilizer Trends

    All eight major fertilizer are priced lower, but for the first time in nearly five months a fertilizer was actually down a significant amount.

  • Potash was just slightly higher in price the fourth week of June 2017 compared to the previous month. Potash had an average price of $340 per ton the fourth week of June. (DTN chart)

    DTN Retail Fertilizer Trends

    Average retail fertilizer prices showed little movement in either direction the fourth week of June 2017, according to fertilizer retailers surveyed by DTN.

  • Of the eight major fertilizers, potash was the only fertilizer that saw a slight price increase the second week of June 2017 compared to a month prior. Potash had an average price of $341 per ton the second week of June 2017, up from $340 per ton the second week of May 2017. (DTN chart)

    DTN Fertilizer Outlook

    Retail fertilizer prices held fairly steady the second week of June 2017, continuing a trend of little movement that has been seen over the past several weeks.

  • Of the eight major fertilizers, potash was the only fertilizer that saw a slight price increase the second week of June 2017 compared to a month prior. Potash had an average price of $341 per ton the second week of June 2017, up from $340 per ton the second week of May 2017. (DTN chart)

    DTN Retail Fertilizer Trends

    Retail fertilizer prices held fairly steady the second week of June 2017, continuing a trend of little movement that has been seen over the past several weeks.

  • With sidedressing season in full swing, now is the time to pull soil and tissue samples in order to mitigate whatever nitrogen losses occurred this spring and summer. (DTN file photo by Pamela Smith)

    Give It the N Test

    Heavy rains pushed through the Corn Belt earlier this spring in several different weather fronts. Corn producers may be wondering if some already applied nitrogen fertilizer may not be available to their young plants.

  • The average retail price of urea was slightly lower at $339 per ton during the last week of May 2017, compared to a month ago. The price of urea is down 10% from a year ago. (DTN chart)

    DTN Retail Fertilizer Trends

    Retail fertilizer prices continued to hold steady the last week of May 2017.

  • Donated fencing supplies and hay sit at Ashland Feed and Seed in Ashland, Kansas, on May 17. This area was the main drop-off point in the town after the March 6 wildfires. (DTN photo by Russ Quinn.)

    United Recovery

    A small town's population did the best it could to manage donated supplies, as well as get them out to those who needed them most.

  • Cattle are again grazing on rangeland in southwestern Kansas and northwest Oklahoma after severe wildfires burned through the region in early March. Englewood, Kansas, rancher David Clawson examines his water tank in mid-May as the recovery process continues. (DTN photo by Russ Quinn)

    Rising From the Ashes

    As some ranchers in the Southern Plains rebuild their homes, as well as fences, they have hope for the future thanks to their faith, a helping hand from neighbors and strangers, and heavier-than-usual rains after wildfires had...

  • Cattle graze in mid-May on rangeland hit by wildfires that spread March 6 north of Englewood, Kansas. Extension educators from Kansas and Oklahoma counties that saw wildfires in previous years say moisture is the key to grassland recovery. (DTN photo by Russ Quinn)

    Moisture Aids Rangeland Recovery

    Timely rains are helping rangelands bounce back from wildfire damage. Extension personnel recently shared what they learned from past wildfires in other counties on the Plains and what were some of the challenges, as well as benefits.

  • On a price per pound of nitrogen basis, the average urea price was at $0.38/lb.N, anhydrous $0.31/lb.N, UAN28 $0.44/lb.N and UAN32 $0.44/lb.N. (DTN chart)

    DTN Retail Fertilizer Trends

    Average retail fertilizer prices continued to stay fairly stable the third week of May 2017, with prices for five of the eight major fertilizers slightly higher and prices for the remaining three slightly lower compared to last month.