Pamela Smith

Crops Technology Editor

Pamela Smith joined DTN/Progressive Farmer staff as Crops Technology Editor in 2012. She previously was seeds and technology editor for Farm Journal Media. In addition to writing, reporting and photography, Pamela served as the writing coach for the magazine staff. An Illinois native, she started her career as a field editor for Prairie Farmer magazine and has freelanced for a multitude of farm, food and travel magazines.

Pamela is a two-time winner of the American Agriculture Editor's Association Writer of the Year honors. In 2009, she received the Jesse H. Neal National Business Journalism award for a series on soybean rust. She was the first agricultural journalist to receive that coveted prize, often referred to as the Pulitzer of business journalism. In 2011, she received a second Neal award as part of a team covering the legacy of passing down the farm through the generations. She has also been named the journalist of the year by the American Phytopathological Society (plant pathologists) and the Weed Science Society of America. She was awarded a national food writing award for her profile of Father Dominic Garramone, a bread-baking priest. Four generations of her family farm in central Illinois.

 

 

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More From This Author

  • Farmers Reid Thompson of Colfax, Illinois, and Ryan Jenkins, of Jay, Florida, are reporting on crop conditions and agricultural topics throughout the 2020 growing season as part of DTN's View From the Cab series. (Photos courtesy of Reid Thompson and Ryan Jenkins)

    View From the Cab

    Weather continues to be the story for DTN's View From the Cab farmers as fire and rain were problems in their respective regions this past week.

  • A simple soil test for soybean cyst nematode can go a long way toward managing the pest, according to Kaitlyn Bissonnette, University of Missouri plant pathologist. (DTN photo by Pamela Smith)

    Time to Check Your Todes

    Fall and dry weather are a perfect combination to pull soil tests for SCN. Soil tests can help determine if resistant varieties and other management tactics are working.

  • Farmers Reid Thompson of Colfax, Illinois, and Ryan Jenkins, of Jay, Florida, are reporting on crop conditions and agricultural topics throughout the 2020 growing season as part of DTN's View From the Cab series. (Photos courtesy of Reid Thompson and Ryan Jenkins)

    View From the Cab

    As harvest progresses, DTN's View From the Cab farmers find themselves thinking about the 2021 crop as they work to bring the current crop home.

  • Farmers Reid Thompson of Colfax, Illinois, and Ryan Jenkins, of Jay, Florida, are reporting on crop conditions and agricultural topics throughout the 2020 growing season as part of DTN's View From the Cab series. (Photos courtesy of Reid Thompson and Ryan Jenkins)

    View From the Cab

    DTN's View From the Cab farmers are deep into harvest as they keep one eye on the weather and try some surprising new tactics to keep communications flowing in the family.

  • Has it been a banner year for soybean cyst nematode (SCN) in your area? Fall is the perfect time to find out by soil testing. SCN females (small white dots) are small compared to larger, nitrogen-fixing nodules, but put a dent in yield. (DTN photo by Pamela Smith)

    Cysts You Shouldn't Ignore

    The hot, dry conditions experienced in much of soybean country this summer likely raised SCN population densities.

  • Farmers Reid Thompson of Colfax, Illinois, and Ryan Jenkins, of Jay, Florida, are reporting on crop conditions and agricultural topics throughout the 2020 growing season as part of DTN's View From the Cab series. (Photos courtesy of Reid Thompson and Ryan Jenkins)

    View From the Cab

    This week, DTN's View From the Cab farmers are hustling to bring in the crop while juggling other things -- such as visits from dignitaries and a surprisingly positive turn in prices.

  • Farmers Reid Thompson of Colfax, Illinois, and Ryan Jenkins, of Jay, Florida, are reporting on crop conditions and agricultural topics throughout the 2020 growing season as part of DTN's View From the Cab series. (Photos courtesy of Reid Thompson and Ryan Jenkins)

    View From the Cab

    This week, DTN's View From the Cab farmers find themselves wishing rains would go away to allow harvest to proceed.

  • A USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, National Identification Services (NIS) botanist examines seeds from an unsolicited package of seed. (Photo courtesy of USDA APHIS)

    Best Blog of the Week

    Officials are still digging into the origins of seeds that arrived in mailboxes this summer.

  • Hurricanes are hard on a cotton crop. Sprouting of seed in open bolls is already evident in Ryan Jenkins' rain-soaked Florida fields. (Photo courtesy of Ryan Jenkins)

    Hurricane Sally Slams Panhandle

    View From the Cab farmer Ryan Jenkins gives an update on surviving Hurricane Sally and the crop left behind.

  • Farmers Reid Thompson of Colfax, Illinois, and Ryan Jenkins, of Jay, Florida, are reporting on crop conditions and agricultural topics throughout the 2020 growing season as part of DTN's View From the Cab series. (Photo courtesy of Reid Thompson and Ryan Jenkins)

    View From the Cab

    This week one DTN View From the Cab farmer begins corn harvest and the other is hunkered down under hurricane-force winds and rain. This week they also talk about even bigger unknowns such as politics and pandemics.

  • Farmers Reid Thompson of Colfax, Illinois, and Ryan Jenkins, of Jay, Florida, are reporting on crop conditions and agricultural topics throughout the 2020 growing season as part of DTN's View From the Cab series. (Photos courtesy of Reid Thompson and Ryan Jenkins)

    View From the Cab

    This week our View From the Cab farmers ready the farm for harvest and face what can be a complex work scenario.

  • Farmers Reid Thompson of Colfax, Illinois, and Ryan Jenkins, of Jay, Florida, are reporting on crop conditions and agricultural topics throughout the 2020 growing season as part of DTN's View From the Cab series. (Photos courtesy of Reid Thompson and Ryan Jenkins)

    View From the Cab

    This week our View From the Cab farmers balance the excitement of impending harvest with a realistic look at how crop conditions are shaping up, concerns about market prices and some changes they are considering for next year.

  • Farmers Reid Thompson of Colfax, Illinois, and Ryan Jenkins, of Jay, Florida, are reporting on crop conditions and agricultural topics throughout the 2020 growing season as part of DTN's View From the Cab series. (Photos courtesy of Reid Thompson and Ryan Jenkins)

    View From the Cab

    Our View From the Cab farmers take a look at cover crops this week as they search the skies for raindrops.

  • Farmers Reid Thompson of Colfax, Illinois, and Ryan Jenkins, of Jay, Florida, are reporting on crop conditions and agricultural topics throughout the 2020 growing season as part of DTN's View From the Cab series. (Photos courtesy of Reid Thompson and Ryan Jenkins)

    View From the Cab

    This week DTN's View From the Cab farmers keep an eye on the weather forecast and talk about landlord management.

  • Farmers Reid Thompson of Colfax, Illinois, and Ryan Jenkins, of Jay, Florida, are reporting on crop conditions and agricultural topics throughout the 2020 growing season as part of DTN's View From the Cab series. (Photo courtesy of Reid Thompson and Ryan Jenkins)

    View From the Cab

    This week, our DTN View From the Cab farmers do their best to head to the field safely to do some yield checks this week.

  • Farmers Reid Thompson of Colfax, Illinois, and Ryan Jenkins, of Jay, Florida, are reporting on crop conditions and agricultural topics throughout the 2020 growing season as part of DTN's View From the Cab series. (Photos courtesy of Reid Thompson and Ryan Jenkins)

    View From the Cab

    This week our View From the Cab farmers find the dog days of summer are over and the need to prepare for harvest has arrived.

  • These are examples of some of the plant-related materials that have been arriving in mailboxes unsolicited from China. It's important that those receiving packages do not plant or discard the seeds. (Photo courtesy of APHIS)

    Best Blog of the Week

    DECATUR, Ill. (DTN) -- Many years ago, my grandmother gave me a gift nestled in a wicker basket. I don't remember the gift, but I've never forgotten the basket.

  • Farmers Reid Thompson of Colfax, Illinois, and Ryan Jenkins, of Jay, Florida, are reporting on crop conditions and agricultural topics throughout the 2020 growing season as part of DTN's View From the Cab series. (Photo courtesy of Reid Thompson and Ryan Jenkins)

    View From the Cab

    Our View From the Cab farmers take on the delicate topic of striking a balance between farming life and family life this week -- and give a view on their growing crops.

  • Packages containing seeds and arriving from China should be not be planted or discarded. If you receive any seeds, report it to authorities.

    Report Mystery Seeds

    Citizens in several states have received unsolicited packages containing seeds that appear to have arrived from China. Concerns the seeds may be an invasive plants species are prompting alerts from state agriculture officials.

  • Social distancing isn't easy, but trying to do the right thing for elderly parents and others makes for interesting times. (DTN photo by Pamela Smith)

    Best Blog of the Week

    Uncomfortable Encounters