Elaine Kub

Contributing Analyst
Elaine Kub

Elaine Kub is the author of Mastering the Grain Markets: How Profits Are Really Made -- a 360-degree look at all aspects of grain trading, which draws on her experiences as a futures broker, market analyst, grain merchandiser, and farmer. She grew up on a family farm in South Dakota and holds an engineering degree and an MBA.

Recent Blogs by Author

  • The nationwide average new-crop corn basis bid in September 2017 isn't stronger than the averages seen in the past three years. Ninety-five percent of all basis bids can fit within a range of two standard deviations away from each data set's average.

    There is usually an expectation that local areas with poor crops might see a response in their new-crop basis bids. The data from September 2017, however, doesn't show significantly more...

More From This Author

  • (DTN photo by Greg Horstmeier)

    DTN Before The Bell Grain Comments

    Corn unchanged. Soybeans 1 1/4 higher. Wheat 3 3/4 lower. End-of-week profit-taking wouldn't be unusual throughout the day.

  • (DTN photo by Greg Horstmeier)

    DTN Before The Bell Grain Comments

    Corn 1 1/2 lower. Soybeans 4 1/2 lower. Wheat 6 3/4 lower. Outside markets could be flighty after the monthly inflation report.

  • Total open interest in cotton futures fell 14.5% since Jan. 26, at the same time the S&P 500 Index dropped 11.8%. (DTN chart by Elaine Kub)

    Kub's Den

    An estimated $9.5 trillion of investment wealth was "created" by the stock market in the two-year rally leading up to this February -- before $3 trillion was "lost" in the recent correction. Commodity markets are affected, too...

  • Sports bettors have a broad universe of alternative bets they can make, and so do farmers. (DTN photo illustration by Nick Scalise)

    Kub's Den

    Sports gamblers have lots of opportunities to place bets at this time of year, and so do grain marketers -- except it's called hedging, to lock in a profitable financial outcome.

  • (DTN photo by Greg Horstmeier)

    DTN Before The Bell Grain Comments

    Corn 1 1/2 higher. Soybeans 3 3/4 higher. Wheat 3/4 higher. Corn and soybeans received better-than-expected export sales report to support their upward momentum.

  • A grocery shopper's appetite for meat is more sensitive to price than her appetite for staple foods like eggs and cereal. (DTN graphic by Elaine Kub)

    Kub's Den

    Lower commodity prices can sometimes trigger greater consumption, but certain types of commodities benefit more than others from the price elasticity of demand.

  • The average American has gone from consuming 204 pounds of wheat flour in 1999 to only 174 pounds in 2017. (DTN illustration by Elaine Kub)

    Kub's Den

    Relatively low prices may encourage U.S. consumers to buy more food and fuel in the upcoming year, but there are some persistent patterns of behavior that could limit the optimism in some ag markets.

  • Together, Brazil and Argentina account for over 66% of the Southern Hemisphere's production of barley, corn, millet, oats, rye, sorghum and mixed grain. (DTN graphic by Elaine Kub)

    Kub's Den

    Grain marketers who would like to see corn prices rise in 2018 should look in any corner of the globe for a supply disruption, but the markets' attention will justifiably remain focused on just a few key producers -- Brazil...

  • The Baltic Dry Index hit a low of 290 in February 2016, then ended December 2016 at 852 but has since climbed to 1,662. (DTN graphic by Elaine Kub)

    Kub's Den

    The Baltic Dry Index was a vivid demonstrator of past boom-and-bust cycles in international commodity demand. This ocean-freight benchmark has nearly doubled during 2017, showing both global economic improvement and also the...