Elaine Kub

Contributing Analyst
Elaine Kub

Elaine Kub is the author of Mastering the Grain Markets: How Profits Are Really Made -- a 360-degree look at all aspects of grain trading, which draws on her experiences as a futures broker, market analyst, grain merchandiser, and farmer. She grew up on a family farm in South Dakota and holds an engineering degree and an MBA.

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  • Although there isn't a direct cause and effect between higher diesel prices and higher corn prices, both commodities are part of a shared inflation picture. (ProphetX chart by Elaine Kub)

    Kub's Den

    Record-high fuel prices drive up shipping costs for virtually every part of the American economy, but they are particularly hard on agricultural producers who will have important fuel needs through the summer and fall harvest...

  • When conditions were fit for planting, America's farmers were able to make up for lost time during spring 2022, but some are still waiting for their window of opportunity. (DTN graphic by Elaine Kub)

    Kub's Den

    More than 5.5 million acres of intended corn ground remains unseeded after a cold, wet start to spring planting in 2022 compressed the season, but despite passing cutoff dates for full insurance coverage, market prices still...

  • There is a threat of further strengthening in the U.S. dollar if investors suddenly abandon certain assets (like cryptocurrency) and buy safe-haven dollars. (DTN graphic by Elaine Kub)

    Kub's Den

    Usually, grain prices go down when the dollar goes up, and vice versa. Today, however, we're seeing a rare test of what happens when both the dollar and the grain markets move higher at the same time together.

  • Front-month corn futures could go past their previous all-time high of $8.43 3/4 from 2012. (Chart by Elaine Kub)

    Kub's Den

    Once a market becomes unstable, you never know how far the other market participants are willing to go, just like a madman president with his finger on the red button.

  • The continuous soybean futures chart never ventured more than 21 cents away from its previous daily close during the calm period of sub-$9 soybeans during March 2019, but lately, it can easily swing up or down by 50 cents throughout a day. (Graphic by Elaine Kub)

    Kub's Den

    It's exciting when soybeans are worth a lot of money and might easily be worth 30, 40 or even 50 cents more per bushel by the end of the day. But for most producers and end users, this kind of volatility isn't enjoyable. The...