Pam Smith

Crops Technology Editor

Pamela Smith joined DTN/The Progressive Farmer staff as Crops Technology Editor in 2012. She previously was seeds and technology editor for Farm Journal Media. In addition to writing, reporting and photography, Pamela served as the writing coach for the magazine staff. A life-long Illinois native, she started her career as a field editor for Prairie Farmer magazine and has freelanced for a multitude of farm, food and travel magazines.

 

Pamela is a two-time winner of the American Agriculture Editor's Association Writer of the Year honors. In 2009, she received the Jesse H. Neal National Business Journalism award for a series on soybean rust. She was the first agricultural journalist to receive that coveted prize, often referred to as the Pulitzer of business journalism. In 2011, she received a second Neal award as part of a team covering the legacy of passing down the farm through the generations. She has also been named the journalist of the year by the American Phytopathological Society (plant pathologists) and was awarded a national food writing award for her profile of Father Dominic Garramone, a bread-baking priest. Five generations of her family farm in central Illinois -- spanning ages of 101 years to 6 months.

Recent Blogs by Author

More From This Author

  • Farmers Genny Haun, of Kenton, Ohio, and Kyle Krier, of Claflin, Kansas, are reporting on crop conditions and agricultural topics throughout the 2018 growing season as part of DTN's View From the Cab series. (DTN photos by Pamela Smith)

    View From the Cab

    Sloppy conditions have made harvest and many other farm activities difficult for DTN's View From the Cab correspondents this past week.

  • Farmers Genny Haun, of Kenton, Ohio, and Kyle Krier, of Claflin, Kansas, are reporting on crop conditions and agricultural topics throughout the 2018 growing season as part of DTN's View From the Cab series. (DTN photos by Pamela Smith)

    View From the Cab

    Storage continues to be a challenge this fall, but rainfall and stalled harvest continue to be a worry.

  • Farmers Genny Haun, of Kenton, Ohio, and Kyle Krier, of Claflin, Kansas, are reporting on crop conditions and agricultural topics throughout the 2018 growing season as part of DTN's View From the Cab series. (DTN photos by Pamela Smith)

    View From the Cab

    After a fitful start to the harvest season, the weather has cooperated to allow DTN's View From the Cab farmers to haul in some stellar yields in record time.

  • Wheat prices showed some excitement in late July and early August, but the rally spurred by news of dry weather in Europe did not last long. More recently, prices have congested in a wedge formation as prices slowly head toward a less volatile time of year (DTN ProphetX chart).

    Todd's Take

    USDA estimated a 3.7% drop in world wheat production in October. That may be the most bullish news wheat hears the rest of the year.

  • Farmers Genny Haun, of Kenton, Ohio, and Kyle Krier, of Claflin, Kansas, are reporting on crop conditions and agricultural topics throughout the 2018 growing season as part of DTN's View From the Cab series. (DTN photos by Pamela Smith)

    View From the Cab

    Weather worries abound for those who have yet to reap the 2018 harvest. But family remains a focus for young farmers as they weather tough times.

  • Farmers Genny Haun, Kenton, Ohio and Kyle Krier, Claflin, Kansas, are reporting on crop conditions and agricultural topics throughout the 2018 growing season as part of DTN's View From the Cab series.

    View From the Cab

    Soggy conditions are delaying harvest in Ohio and Kansas for DTN's View From the Cab farmers.

  • Lone Tree Schoolhouse is all that is left of Lone Tree Corners, also known as Lone Tree, a former community east of Bradford, Illinois, in Bureau County. The town was established in 1840 and demolished in 1920s -- with the exception of the school. It was closed in 1942, but continues to stand and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. (DTN photo by Pamela Smith)

    Poetry on the Prairie

    There is a permanence and poetry to the land that feeds the soul when we stop and take time to listen.

  • Farmers Genny Haun, of Kenton, Ohio, and Kyle Krier, of Claflin, Kansas, are reporting on crop conditions and agricultural topics throughout the 2018 growing season as part of DTN's View From the Cab series. (DTN photos by Pamela Smith)

    View From the Cab

    There's a need to be careful as harvest gets into full swing both on and off the field.

  • Farmers Genny Haun, of Kenton, Ohio and Kyle Krier, of Claflin, Kansas, are reporting on crop conditions and agricultural topics throughout the 2018 growing season as part of DTN's View From the Cab series.

    View From the Cab

    DTN's View from the Cab correspondents look forward to gathering the crop and are hoping a plan can help avoid problems later.

  • Farmers Genny Haun, Kenton, Ohio, and Kyle Krier, Claflin, Kansas, are reporting on crop conditions and agricultural topics throughout the 2018 growing season as part of DTN's View From the Cab series.

    View From the Cab

    Our View From the Cab farmers have an eye on harvest as wacky weather continues to create questions.

  • Farmers Genny Haun, Kenton, Ohio, and Kyle Krier, Claflin, Kansas, are reporting on crop conditions and agricultural topics throughout the 2018 growing season as part of DTN's View From the Cab series. (DTN photos by Pamela Smith)

    View From the Cab

    Auctions come in all forms and this week DTN's View From the Cab farmers find themselves on two very different sides of the bidding.

  • Our agricultural fences in need of repair and can we do it together? (DTN photo by Pamela Smith)

    DTN Blog of the Week

    The Neighborly Thing

  • Farmers Genny Haun, Kenton, Ohio, and Kyle Krier, Claflin, Kansas, are reporting on crop conditions and agricultural topics throughout the 2018 growing season as part of DTN's View From the Cab series.

    View From the Cab

    The biggest harvest headache for our View From the Cab contributors may be where to go with all the grain.