Todd Hultman

DTN Lead Analyst

Todd Hultman is a DTN grain market analyst, and has worked in the commodity futures industry since 1985.

 

Todd began his career as a broker with Delta Futures Group in Omaha, where he relied on DTN's news and market quotes. In 1997, he left the brokerage business with a desire to spend more time researching the futures markets and educating others. The move led to the creation of an online educational resource for futures traders. That same strong interest to research and teach brought a Todd to DTN where he enjoys commenting on the grain markets. Todd is a 1981 graduate of the University of Nebraska at Omaha and has lived in the Omaha area for most of his life.

Recent Blogs by Author

More From This Author

  • As of Nov. 3, U.S. corn export commitments total 580 million bushels in 2022-23, the slowest start for this time of year in three years. As the nine previous years show above, corn sales don't typically follow predictable lines, but often unfold in erratic spurts with December to June representing the more active period. (DTN ProphetX chart by Todd Hultman)

    Todd's Take

    Many are questioning USDA's decision to keep their estimate of U.S. corn exports unchanged in November as early sales in 2022-23 are off to a pathetic start. Given the context of this year's...

  • Farming has come a long way in the past couple hundred years, thanks largely to inputs that rely heavily on carbon fuels. Finding new alternatives, while feeding a growing world population that is soon to exceed 8 billion, presents big challenges ahead. (Public domain photo)

    Todd's Take

    The world's population is growing and the push is on to minimize the use of carbon-based fuels. Standards of living have never been so good, but can we perpetuate the miracles that got us here?

  • (urfinguss, Getty Images)

    Inside the Market

    The world's population will reach 8 billion in November, which means increased food production when current methods rely heavily on fossil fuels that many contend need to be reduced, all while there is a shrinking share of farmers.

  • If USDA is correct and the weather cooperates, Brazil will harvest 5.58 billion bushels of soybeans in 2023, the 10th time the country has produced a record soybean crop since 2010. (DTN ProphetX chart by Todd Hultman).

    Todd's Take

    Brazil's soybean crop isn't even half planted yet and traders are already concerned about its bearish impact on future prices. We have seen this before.

  • Despite numerous outside market concerns scaring traders, prices for the two main feed ingredients, corn and soybean meal have remained well-supported this summer and fall, even during harvest. (DTN ProphetX chart by Todd Hultman)

    Todd's Take

    A hawkish Fed, tight supplies of crops, widespread drought and a megalomaniacal Russian President are tugging crop prices in different directions. How will this movie turn out?

  • USDA will release its latest Crop Production and World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates (WASDE) reports on Wednesday, Oct. 12. (USDA logo)

    USDA Reports Preview

    What to expect from USDA's October Crop Production and World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates (WASDE) reports, which will be released on Wednesday, Oct. 12.

  • (Brent Warren)

    Inside the Market

    The five years of doing the DTN Digital Yield Tour has been a learning process, and the yield estimates appear to be getting more accurate.

  • USDA will release its latest Crop Production and World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates (WASDE) reports on Monday, Sept. 12. (USDA logo)

    USDA Reports Preview

    What to expect from USDA's September Crop Production and World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates (WASDE) reports, which will be released on Monday, Sept. 12.

  • From 2014 to early 2020, spot corn prices were well contained, trading between $3 and $4.50 a bushel, while the ending corn surplus remained stable, near 2 billion bushels. Today's corn supplies are much tighter and prices are more volatile, which is a more chaotic environment with a cluster of impediments to production that are not going away easily. (DTN ProphetX chart by Todd Hultman)

    Todd's Take

    In the early 1960s, a gifted mathematician on his way to creating a new form of geometry turned his attention to cotton prices and financial markets. Several decades later, his observations remain as relevant as ever.

  • (Barry Falkner)

    Inside the Market

    What would we do if missiles rained down on the U.S.? Where would we get food and basic necessities? Now think about Ukraine.