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  • The June 30 USDA Acreage report added 1.3 million acres that were not there in the March report. (DTN photo by Pamela Smith)
    by Alan Brugler , DTN Contributing Analyst

    The March Planting Intentions gives producers early warnings about decisions that might harm them. The June Acreage report, which was released this past Friday, is valuable because it trues-up the numbers.

  • If there was a surprise in the Friday, June 9, report numbers, it was that USDA increased its estimate of Brazil's soybean production from 111.6 million metric tons to 114.0 mmt in 2016-17 and its estimate of Argentina's production from 57.0 mmt to 57.8 mmt. (DTN file photo)
    by Todd Hultman , DTN Grains Analyst

    DTN Senior Analyst Darin Newsom encouraged us to pick a card, any card before the WASDE report on Friday, June 9. It looks like we'll have to pick again before we learn more about this year's crops.

  • The soybean stocks-to-use ratio continues to fall, based on USDA estimates. (Chart by Alan Brugler)
    by Alan Brugler , DTN Contributing Analyst

    USDA cut projected soybean ending stocks last week, thus lowering the 2016-17 stocks-to-use ratio to 20.22%, the tightest since 2008-09. The market is nervous about the eventual ratio being even tighter.

  • U.S. corn stocks totaled 11.212 billion bushels as of Dec. 1, USDA said on Tuesday. (DTN file photo by Scott Kemper)
    by Alan Brugler , DTN Contributing Analyst

    USDA showed almost no change in its quarterly U.S. corn stocks estimate versus a year ago in Tuesday's report. However, this year isn't as similar to last year as the national numbers might suggest.

  • The USDA Grain Stocks report Wednesday showed Sept. 1 corn stocks of 1.731 billion bushels, up from 1.236 billion bushels last year and 821 million bushels in September 2013. (DTN/The Progressive Farmer file photo by Jim Patrico)
    by Alan Brugler , DTN Contributing Analyst

    USDA's corn stocks report Wednesday was not a surprise, and the market didn't treat it like one. Regional supplies in the Eastern Corn Belt will be radically different than those in the west, resulting in different basis patterns for the two regions but tied together via freight.

  • USDA raised the national average soybean yield estimate to the second highest ever in its report this week. (DTN photo by Pam Smith)

    USDA's latest round of reports may have thrown a curveball on soybean ending stocks, but that doesn't mean the show is over. In fact, it's just beginning.

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