DTN's Quick Takes

Periodic Updates on the Grains, Livestock Futures Markets

(Illustration by Nick Scalise)
Grains

OMAHA (DTN) -- As we near Wednesday's close, December corn is trading up 1 1/2 cents and November soybeans are down 1 1/4 cents. September KC wheat is up 6 1/4 cents and September Minneapolis wheat is down 16 3/4 cents. Wednesday's wheat trade shows a modest correction in the Minneapolis/KC wheat spread with chances for rain in the extended forecast for the western Canadian Prairies. Even so, spring wheat crops remain in tough shape and will suffer hot temperatures in the northwestern U.S. Plains through most of next week. September Dow Jones futures are trading up 261 points and the September U.S. Dollar Index is down 0.22. September crude oil is up $3.18, reflecting an easing of coronavirus concerns on demand.

Posted 10:36 -- At midmorning Wednesday, December corn is trading up 1/2 cent, November soybeans are down 5 1/4 cents. September KC wheat is up 5 cents and September Minneapolis wheat is down 18 3/4 cents. Along with lower spring wheat prices, November canola is trading C$48.00 lower and dragging December soybean oil down 1.65 cents, apparently related to questionable rain chances for the Western Canadian Prairies. September Dow Jones futures are trading up 228 points and the September U.S. Dollar Index is down 0.16. August gold is down $7.90 and September crude oil is up $2.66, taking back part of Monday's big loss.

Posted 08:34 -- December corn is up 6 3/4 cents per bushel, November soybeans are up 5 cents, September KC wheat is up 7 1/4 cents, September Chicago wheat is up 5 1/4 cents and September Minneapolis wheat is down 5 1/2 cents. The Dow Jones Industrial Average is up 153.53 points and September crude oil is up $1.66 per barrel. The U.S. Dollar Index is up 0.100 and August gold is down $11.80 per ounce. Corn and soybeans are a bit higher ahead of the hot and dry two-week forecast. Minneapolis futures are taking a breather as some modest showers are rolling through parts of the Northern Plains and Canadian Prairies.

Livestock

Posted 11:44 -- August live cattle are up $0.40 at $120.175, August feeder cattle are up $0.78 at $156.3, August lean hogs are up $1.18 at $106.175, December corn is up 3 1/2 cents per bushel and December soybean meal is up $5.90. The Dow Jones Industrial Average is up 247.32 points and NASDAQ is up 78.56 points. The Fed Cattle Exchange Auction listed a total of 3,367 head, of which 426 actually sold, 426 were scratched from the auction and 2,037 head were listed as unsold, as they did not meet the reserve prices that ranged from $118 to $124. Opening prices ranged from $118, high bids ranged from $119. The state-by-state breakdown looks like this: Texas 2,889 total head, with 426 head sold at $119, 2,037 head unsold and 426 were scratched from the auction; Kansas 417 total head, all of which went unsold; Oklahoma 61 total head, all of which sold at $119.

Posted 10:36 -- August live cattle are up $0.18 at $119.95, August feeder cattle are up $0.73 at $156.25, August lean hogs are up $0.95 at $105.95, December corn is up 1/4 cent per bushel and December soybean meal is up $3.70. The Dow Jones Industrial Average is up 205.71 points and NASDAQ is up 79.48 points. The corn market is trading mostly sideways and that has given the cattle contracts the ability to rally alongside the lean hog market. The cash cattle market hasn't seen any trade develop as of yet, but asking prices of $120-plus are noted in the South and $200-plus in the North. Some cash cattle trade is expected to develop before the day's end.

Posted 08:35 -- August live cattle are up $0.13 at $119.9, August feeder cattle are down $0.38 at $155.15, August lean hogs are up $0.50 at $105.5, December corn is up 4 3/4 cents per bushel and December soybean meal is up $3.50. The Dow Jones Industrial Average is up 160.92 points and NASDAQ is up 3.99 points. As Wednesday's trade jumps into motion, the lean hog market bat an eye at trading higher and sets out to continue its higher quest. Higher corn prices are hindering the feeder cattle market's ability to do much of anything and will likely keep trading higher amid a dry forecast throughout the Corn Belt.