ShayLe Stewart

DTN Livestock Analyst
ShayLe Stewart

ShayLe Stewart is the newest member of the DTN analysis team (September 2019), and comes with deep roots in the beef industry.

Based in the high mountain cattle country near Cody, Wyoming, Stewart leads coverage in all areas of livestock and meat production, and brings a true boots-on-the-ground perspective to a livestock marketing world that gets increasingly difficult to navigate.

ShayLe grew up on a cow-calf and haying operation in south-central Montana, where her passion for the beef industry led her to Colorado State University, ultimately to an internship with the United States Cattlemen's Association. Her experiences following markets for USCA were the springboard for her self-produced Cattle Market News website and Facebook outlets. Those weekly reports were a reliable source of compressed, easy-to-understand, digestible market information.

While her background is in the ranching West, ShayLe comes with a solid list of market contacts from around the country. Talking each week to sale barn owners, feed lot managers, and other industry experts, she is able to ask the questions that cattlemen need answered in order to find clarity in a complex and dynamic market.

ShayLe and her husband, Jimmy, run a registered herd of Sim-Angus females, and host an annual bull sale in Powell, Wyoming.

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  • I'd like to think that most days the market focuses on greater things than just boxed beef prices; but when traders are hungry for intel, they'll take what they can get. (DTN photo by ShayLe Stewart)

    Call the Market

    The drop in boxed beef prices -- or more specifically, choice boxed beef prices -- caught the industry off guard this week, even though it's practically like clockwork that beef prices bottom...

  • Feeder cattle prices have jumped sharply higher with the onset of cheaper corn prices. (DTN file photo by Jim Patrico)

    Sort and Cull

    We know that prices are expected to be higher for both feeder cattle and fat cattle in 2023, as the industry simply doesn't have as many cattle as in years past. But with the onset of higher inputs, and higher interest rates...

  • With an opportunity lingering for cattlemen to finally gain the upper hand in the market, it's also important that cattlemen check in on the market over the span between Thanksgiving and the New Year. (Photo by Jim Patrico)

    Call the Market

    There are several key factors that are important to monitor through the year's end -- fat cattle prices and volumes purchased; feeder cattle prices and corn trends; and boxed beef values, along with throughput.

  • Regardless of what happens this week and next, in terms of prices, seeing as few cattle as possible trade into the deferred delivery commitment would be most helpful for feedlots in the weeks ahead. (DTN photo by ShayLe Stewart)

    Sort and Cull

    It may be infuriating to see cash cattle prices chop sideways when it's possible the market could have traded higher, but if feedlots could simply trade cattle for the nearby delivery, as opposed to committing them to the deferred...

  • Weighing out both the bullish and bearish factors of the market can help add some clarity to the many moving pieces the market currently possesses. (DTN ProphetX graphic).

    Call the Market

    There are both positive and negative influences weighing on today's market, but with the added volatility of a weakened economy and high interest rates, this isn't the type of market where you can rest your hat on historical habits.

  • It's become common for producers to paint a bleach mark on the females that need to be culled, whether because they're open, late or broken mouthed. This may be a practice that needs rethought as it can be costly to sellers. (Photo courtesy of Dr. Matthew Asay)

    Best Blog of the Week

    Bleach-marking cows is an easy and convenient way for ranchers to mark which cows need to go to town; but when it's also used as a tool against them when it's time to sell, producers may need to rethink how they mark their cull...

  • It's become common for producers to paint a bleach mark on the females that need to be culled, whether because they're open, late or broken mouthed. This may be a practice that needs rethought as it can be costly to sellers. (Photo courtesy Dr. Matthew Asay)

    Sort and Cull

    Bleach-marking cows is an easy and convenient way for ranchers to mark which cows need to go to town; but when it's also used as a tool against them when it's time to sell, producers may need to rethink how they mark their cull...

  • The outside pressures that have loomed over the cattle market haven't gone anywhere, but with Monday's stronger close, cattlemen are wondering if the market is ready to trade higher. (DTN photo by ShayLe Stewart)

    Sort and Cull

    The battle between what's developing and transpiring within the cattle market -- and what's developing and transpiring throughout our economy -- will rage on for some time. Nevertheless, the market will continue to be a balancing...

  • Given that last week's market saw steady to $1 higher trade, everyone will be watching this week to see if the market regains its upward trajectory after packers successfully pushed the market lower for three weeks around Labor Day. (DTN photo by Elaine Shein)

    Sort and Cull

    With feedlots able to keep cash cattle prices steady to $1 up last week, there's a strong chance that prices trade higher again this week as packers need to procure cattle to avoid becoming short bought.